People who fit into the product aware category are interested in price. So what better way to win them over than to draw their attention to your savings. Use a large, centered image of your discount, so that it’s the first thing they’re drawn to when they open your email. Next, add a clear call-to-action that stands out, making it obvious on what they have to do next.
Another approach is to incorporate gifs into your design to get users to stay in the email longer. This example from Your Karma leads with the brand’s main selling point, its premium features. Then they call out the savings users get when they sign up. It’s like saying, “Hey, we have the best features. You can enjoy them too and save big if you act now.”
A lot of times users are ready to buy but take their time doing so. One way to get them to act quicker is to send time sensitive offers. In the Creative Market example below, they offered people deep discounts if they bought before the deadline. The combination of the discount and the fear of missing out on a limited-time offer are enough to get people to buy.
What is that makes Alice in Wonderland so powerful and resonant? It’s a tale that’s been retold – through books, movies, TV, video games, and various other content formats – time and time again. Terms like “down the rabbit hole” and “through the looking glass” are now fixtures in our collective lexicon. Almost everyone is familiar with Lewis Carroll’s whimsical world of fantasy.

The new digital era has enabled brands to selectively target their customers that may potentially be interested in their brand or based on previous browsing interests. Businesses can now use social media to select the age range, location, gender and interests of whom they would like their targeted post to be seen by. Furthermore, based on a customer's recent search history they can be ‘followed’ on the internet so they see advertisements from similar brands, products and services,[40] This allows businesses to target the specific customers that they know and feel will most benefit from their product or service, something that had limited capabilities up until the digital era.
Not only is InVision's newsletter a great mix of content, but I also love the nice balance between images and text, making it really easy to read and mobile-friendly -- which is especially important, because its newsletters are so long. (Below is just an excerpt, but you can read through the full email here.) We like the clever copy on the call-to-action (CTA) buttons, too.
The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) is set to give consumers more control over their personal data starting Jan. 2020. To measure the potential impact the CCPA may have on the media and advertising industries, several studies are being conducted. The most recent studies from BritePool and Annenberg Research show that 87% of consumers would opt out of ad targeting when given the option through the CCPA, making it even harder for organizations to reach their target audience. Adweek
I took-away the point of the article being that content of your emails are the most important component. Looking at a single email or an acquisition blast, I could buy the argument that Subject Lines and From Address determine if the email gets read. But as most of us know, email marketing is more effective at continuing the conversation and building a relationship with our customers.
Companies often use email marketing to re-engage past customers, but a “Where’d You Go? Want To Buy This?” message can come across as aggressive, and you want to be careful with your wording to cultivate a long-term email subscriber. This is why JetBlue’s one year re-engagement email works so well -- it uses humor to convey a sense of friendliness and fun, while simultaneously reminding an old email subscriber they might want to check out some of JetBlue’s new flight deals.
Not only is InVision's newsletter a great mix of content, but I also love the nice balance between images and text, making it really easy to read and mobile-friendly -- which is especially important, because its newsletters are so long. (Below is just an excerpt, but you can read through the full email here.) We like the clever copy on the call-to-action (CTA) buttons, too.
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