Here’s something you might not know (at least it was news to me): While Intuit does market to consumers, B2B customers comprise a large portion of the company’s base – its ProConnect division sells products to tax and accounting professionals, while Intuit, in general, is reliant on such pros to recommend TurboTax and QuickBooks to their own clients.

Well, charity: water took an alternate route. Once someone donates to a charity: water project, her money takes a long journey. Most charities don't tell you about that journey at all -- charity: water uses automated emails to show donors how their money is making an impact over time. With the project timeline and accompanying table, you don't even really need to read the email -- you know immediately where you are in the whole process so you can move onto other things in your inbox.
Using Dr Dave Chaffey's approach, the digital marketing planning (DMP) has three main stages: Opportunity, Strategy and Action. He suggests that any business looking to implement a successful digital marketing strategy must structure their plan by looking at opportunity, strategy and action. This generic strategic approach often has phases of situation review, goal setting, strategy formulation, resource allocation and monitoring.[60]
Digital marketing planning is a term used in marketing management. It describes the first stage of forming a digital marketing strategy for the wider digital marketing system. The difference between digital and traditional marketing planning is that it uses digitally based communication tools and technology such as Social, Web, Mobile, Scannable Surface.[58][59] Nevertheless, both are aligned with the vision, the mission of the company and the overarching business strategy.[60]
"Why aren't millennials moving?" The subject line of this email campaign reads before citing interesting data about relocation trends in the U.S. Trulia doesn't benefit from people who choose not to move, but the company does benefit from having its fingers on the pulse of the industry -- and showing it cares which way the real estate winds are blowing.
Ben, My target market is Baby Boomers and their parents. It is my understanding that many of them use search engines to look up information on the internet, which explains the posts on my blogs. Almost all of them know how to use email. I like your idea of referencing pop-culture. My question is if I should reference today’s pop-culture to Baby Boomers or the stuff that was popular when we were kids. Sonia, a few months back you suggested building a “course” for autoresponders. I wanted to let you know that I am about half-way through with a course for Insurance Retirement Planning. Although each lesson has practical ideas of what people can do with insurance, at the end of each lesson I direct them to a place where they can buy my ebooks. I’m trusting that your concept of giving away free education will result in sales. I have seen the model work before. My concern is over what to do after the course is prepared to get people to subscribe. If it has no subscribers, it will not be read and will be a lot of work for nothing.
Flash forward to today and my Inbox is filled with ALL kinds of e-mail marketing offers for a free ebook, webinar, or course. But you know which ones I look forward to opening? It’s the one that has no sales pitch, just an incredibly hilarious story that makes me laugh to the point of peeing my pants. It’s also what keeps me wanting to open each and every single e-mail after that. It’s refreshing to be treated like a plain ‘ol human being and not a highly researched buyer persona.
Well, charity: water took an alternate route. Once someone donates to a charity: water project, her money takes a long journey. Most charities don't tell you about that journey at all -- charity: water uses automated emails to show donors how their money is making an impact over time. With the project timeline and accompanying table, you don't even really need to read the email -- you know immediately where you are in the whole process so you can move onto other things in your inbox.
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