The difference between a large company like Budweiser and smaller business owners like I work with is we can’t afford to just tell an emotional story and leave our ‘logo’ there.  That works for them because they have the budget and the time for it to pay dividends.  What my clients and I do is tell story, provide useful but incomplete content in the story, and then connect the story to our product/service immediately.
When doing discounts and limited time specials, I’ll use “Reason Why” stories.  Here’s the reason why we’re making this offer.  It could be an event like Christmas, a birthday, or a “holiday” based on the business, itself such as the seventh anniversary of your first website.  Or I could be sharing the reason why the prices are so good, such as we purchased a huge inventory at discount prices or it’s a scratch-and-dent sale.

Dubbed by MarketingProfs as the “most let’s get down to business but not take ourselves too seriously while doing it marketing conference on the planet,” B2B Forum brings together many of the brightest minds in the industry around a singular focus: improving. The well-rounded agenda on tap will run the gamut of vital topics in the modern B2B marketing environment, offering opportunities to improve by learning from foremost experts and leaders in the field.


For email, the easiest type of story to get started with is a case study.  Contact some of your happy customers and find out how they found your product and what results they have from it. Is anyone using what you sell in a unique way?  Those are obvious stories to start with and perfect for proving both the problem your product solves and the promises you make.

Prioritizing clicks refers to display click ads, although advantageous by being ‘simple, fast and inexpensive’ rates for display ads in 2016 is only 0.10 percent in the United States. This means one in a thousand click ads are relevant therefore having little effect. This displays that marketing companies should not just use click ads to evaluate the effectiveness of display advertisements (Whiteside, 2016).[43]

First of all, BuzzFeed has awesome subject lines and preview text. They are always short and punchy -- which fits in perfectly with the rest of BuzzFeed's content. I especially love how the preview text will accompany the subject line. For example, if the subject line is a question, the preview text is the answer. Or if the subject line is a command (like the one below), the preview text seems like the next logical thought right after it:
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